Nº. 2 of  6

The Globalism Notebook

Endless curiosity about people, culture and commerce in a flat world

motherjones:

Happy Marathon Sunday! This is what the first Olympic marathon looked like. The pants were probably a bad idea.
But it’s not all fun and games. As Kate Sheppard explains, today’s marathons also leave behind record-breaking environmental footprints. Even if you go barefoot.

motherjones:

Happy Marathon Sunday! This is what the first Olympic marathon looked like. The pants were probably a bad idea.

But it’s not all fun and games. As Kate Sheppard explains, today’s marathons also leave behind record-breaking environmental footprints. Even if you go barefoot.

For as long as the culture of business has been an integral part of American life, it has also been frowned upon by important sectors of our society. Among our intellectuals especially, the business world has been the subject of many brutal caricatures, portraying corporations large and small, and the people who run them, as heartless, soulless agents of greed. These caricatures have shaped our implicit understanding of the nature of the business world, so much that they have come to pass for conventional wisdom.

—Algis Valiunas, for National Affairs (via utnereader)

So you want to change the world? Cynics may send you off to Wall Street or a white-shoe law firm. Those with gumption will look for another way. The new Master’s of Fine Arts in Design for Social Innovation has opened its doors just for them.

“We’re adamant this not be a program where people sit in a classroom and talk about how great it’s going to be when they go out and change the world,” says program chair Cheryl Heller at the School of Visual Arts (SVA) in New York, and a board member of PopTech. “It is helping designers go beyond self-expression, which is how most designers are taught, and how to put [design] into practice to create a change.”

(via poptech)

You know what would be awesome?

motherjones:

Is if people got as pissed off about new bank debit-card fees (and overdraft fees, and ATM fees, and transaction fees, and credit card fees) as they did about a Netflix price hike.

poptech:

Paul Needham is interested in why and how people buy things. As a doctoral student at Cambridge, he specialized in a field of economics that asked questions like “What does it cost a buyer to find a seller?” Does the buyer have to travel a great distance, for instance? Does she have to pay a fee to a middle man? So when he started thinking about energy access—how to improve the way people in places without strong electricity infrastructure get their power—one of the questions he asked himself was “Why don’t I own solar panels?” 

GOOD profiles 2011 Social Innovation Fellow Paul Needham who founded Simpa Networks, which sells high quality solar energy systems on a pay-as-you-go basis to underserved people in emerging markets.

The digital revolution of the first decade of the 21st century now has all of us producing vast amounts of data, just by going about our daily lives. Today we are swimming in an ocean of data, most of which didn’t exist even a few years ago. One of the defining challenges of the second decade will be to harness this new “unnatural resource” for both commercial profit and public good.

A great deal of the “big data” out there is user-generated content available on the open web — news stories, blogs, social networks, etc. But a great deal of it isn’t. Instead, it’s what’s called “massive passive data” or “data exhaust.” It’s the personal data corporations collect about what products their customers buy and about how they use digital services. Corporations today are mining this data to gain a real-time understanding of their customers, identify new markets, and make investment decisions. This is the data that powers business, which the World Economic Forum has described as a new asset class.

(Source: poptech)

SIR – I must object in the strongest terms to the use of the oxymoronic neologism, “bottomless shallows”, in a Banyan column. Please inform your Mr Banyan that oxymorons must be stamped out wherever found, and are particularly galling in a newspaper of your standing and heritage. I am certain that Messrs Samuel Johnson, Walter Bagehot and Henry Watson Fowler are all spinning in their respective graves at this slight, albeit at different speeds. You know well how lapses like this affect school truancy, foment social disorder and encourage a preference for margarine on one’s scones. Sin not again.

—An Economist reader reminds us of our responsibilities. And rightly so. (via theeconomist)

globalvoices:

Chennai fishermen take part in the mapping of their livelihoods, as part of the Rising Voices Transparent Chennai participatory mapping project.
Click here for information of the fishing community’s living spaces (scroll down for English).

globalvoices:

Chennai fishermen take part in the mapping of their livelihoods, as part of the Rising Voices Transparent Chennai participatory mapping project.

Click here for information of the fishing community’s living spaces (scroll down for English).

flavorpill:


Mead writes, “Are the disturbances which vex our adolescents due to the nature of adolescence itself or to the civilization? Under different conditions does adolescence present a different picture?” During her time in Samoa, Mead, then only a 23-year-old budding anthropologist, lived with and interviewed a group of Samoan women and girls, aged 9 to 20, about their upbringings, hopes, and fears, concluding that Samoans were better off psychologically than their American counterparts. Which, as you can guess, didn’t sit well with some, and sparked the never ending “nature vs. nurture” debate.

Our Picks from ‘TIME’ Magazine’s Top 100 Nonfiction Books

flavorpill:

Mead writes, “Are the disturbances which vex our adolescents due to the nature of adolescence itself or to the civilization? Under different conditions does adolescence present a different picture?” During her time in Samoa, Mead, then only a 23-year-old budding anthropologist, lived with and interviewed a group of Samoan women and girls, aged 9 to 20, about their upbringings, hopes, and fears, concluding that Samoans were better off psychologically than their American counterparts. Which, as you can guess, didn’t sit well with some, and sparked the never ending “nature vs. nurture” debate.

Our Picks from ‘TIME’ Magazine’s Top 100 Nonfiction Books

Nº. 2 of  6